Postgraduate Research Community Conference 2020

Theme: Navigating challenging terrain in education

Sat 3 Oct 2020, 8.30am–5pm

Online via Zoom 

Program (available soon)

Welcome to the 2020 HDR Community Conference site!

This year, the HDR Community Conference will be held online via Zoom on Saturday 3 October 2020. The cornerstone of this conference is supporting development of student researchers; therefore, students are encouraged to contribute education research even if not explicitly aligned with the conference theme.

This year, there will be two options:

i) Paper presentations

15-minute presentation + 5 minutes discussion
Live via Zoom in a session with 2 other papers
Submit an abstract (150-200 words)  AND a presentation proposal (up to 1200 words)
Please see below for advice on abstracts and presentation proposals

ii) Poster presentations

Live via own Zoom session
Participants attend drop-in style during allocated time
Submit an abstract only (150-200 words)
Please see below for advice on abstracts

UQ Research students are invited to submit an abstract (and a proposal) for this year’s conference.

Proposals and Abstracts are due on Friday 28 August 2020. 

Submit here 

Please submit a single file in Word or PDF and include your name, email and title.

  • Poster  - Abstract (150-200 words exl. references)
  • Presentation - Abstract (150-200 words) + proposal (up to 1200 words exl. references, figures and tables) 

Professor Lingard is currently a Professorial Fellow at the Institute for Learning Sciences & Teacher Education at Australian Catholic University and an Emeritus Professor at The University of Queensland. He has also been a Professor at the University of Sheffield in England and held the Andrew Bell Chair of Education at the University of Edinburgh. He has authored and edited 25 books and published more than 200 book chapters and journal articles in the leading international journals in his fields of the sociology of education and education policy. His most recent books include, the edited Globalisation and Education (Routledge, 2021) and Digital Disruption in Teaching and Testing (Routledge, 2021), and the authored, Globalizing Educational Accountabilities (Routledge, 2016) and Politics, Policies and Pedagogies in Education (Routledge, 2014). Bob has recently completed a report for UNESCO (2019) entitled, Digital Learning Assessments and Big Data: Implications for Teacher Professionalism. Bob is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences in Australia and also of the Academy of Social Sciences in the UK. He is also a Life Member of the Australian Association for Research in Education, the Queensland Teachers’ Union, and the Institute of Modern Art. He has won more than $4.5 million in research grants of various kinds and supervised more than 50 PhD students to completion. He is also an Honorary Professor at the University of Glasgow and the Education University of Hong Kong.

Emeritus Professor Bob Lingard

Theorising and Researching Changing Global/National/Local Imbrications in Education Policy

In the context of the end of the Cold War, social scientists gave great emphasis to globalisation and its impact upon nations, including on the workings of the nation-state and on education policy. The taken-for-granted idea that education policy was developed and implemented solely under the jurisdiction of the nation (or sub-national political units) was challenged and attempts were made to move beyond methodological nationalism in education policy research in that context. Here emphasis was given to the globalisation of education policy discourses and the emergence of a global education policy field created largely through the work of International Large-Scale Assessments (e.g., the OECD’s PISA and the IEA’s TIMSS and PIRLS) that constituted the globe as a commensurate space of measurement. More recently, we have witnessed both left and right critiques of globalisation; from the right this has manifested, for example, in President Trump’s America First and Make America Great Again tropes, as well as in Brexit. These right-wing backlashes have rearticulated new nationalisms, ethnonationalism and new racisms. This Keynote Address will seek to document these changing imbrications of the global/national and local relations and analyse their significance for theorising and researching education policy today. This will, inter alia, entail a move beyond both methodological nationalism and methodological globalism. This will also involve consideration of the changing spaces and scales of education policy production. Some brief consideration will also be given to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and the climate crisis on these matters.

The Postgraduate Research Community Conference is an annual conference hosted by the School of Education at The University of Queensland. Our organising commitee are looking forward to delivering this year's conference. 

Ms Danielle Jeffery
PhD Candidate
School of Education
Mr Md Maksud Ali
PhD Candidate
School of Education
Dr Stephen Tucker
Lecturer
School of Education
Dr Suraiya Abdul Hameed
Lecturer
School of Education

The monthly HDR Forums will be covering a number of skills related to this conference given the online format this year. The forums will run on the final Thursday of each month at 12.30pm. They will run via Zoom for the foreseeable future.

Please see an outline of the topics below. All sessions will be recorded and available to watch via links below.

  • Conference Proposal Workshop - Thursday 25 June 2020 (recording here and files here)
  • Abstract Writing and Reviewing Workshop - Thursday 30 July 2020
  • Conference poster and presentation workshop - Thursday 27 August 2020
  • Conference networking workshop - Thursday 24 September 2020

All are welcome to attend our Postgraduate Research Community Conference 2020. 

Registration for the conference will open on Tuesday 1 September 2020. 

The program will be announced on Friday 11 September 2020. 

 

This is a unique time in our history as the world is currently undergoing unprecedented challenges as well as a global crisis that requires solidarity in action to overcome them. We are mindful amidst this challenging landscape and context that education and educational research is critical in its ever-present role to challenge the norms. We have an opportunity to think deeply and to reflect on unique approaches for navigating, and possibly generating new resources as well as considering new ways to address fractures that have emerged in communities. This is a critical moment in time to consider a way forward. HDR participants are invited to interrogate the challenges within education and examine the potential of educational research to reconnect communities globally.

HDR students can consider their research in relation to education themes such as, but not limited to:

  • Learner and/or Teacher Experiences
  • Curriculum, Pedagogies and Policy
  • Teacher Education
  • Scholarship of Teaching and Learning
  • Social Justice
  • Researcher Experiences
  • Education Technology

We are looking forward to your participation and support.

 

The Postgraduate Research Community Conference is an annual conference hosted by the School of Education at The University of Queensland. The conference aims to give students an opportunity to present their work-in-progress within a supportive community of peers and academics.

For previous conference information, please click here